The TRHT/Selma team visited Richmond in October 2017.  Getting to know the city and IofC's walk through history tradition began here on Libby Hill under the leadership of Rev. Sylvester "Tee" Turner (third from right), Director of Reconciliation Programs, with support from Rob Corcoran (far left), Strategic Advisor for Community Trustbuilding. 

The TRHT/Selma team visited Richmond in October 2017.  Getting to know the city and IofC's walk through history tradition began here on Libby Hill under the leadership of Rev. Sylvester "Tee" Turner (third from right), Director of Reconciliation Programs, with support from Rob Corcoran (far left), Strategic Advisor for Community Trustbuilding. 

trht around the u.s.

In June 2017, the Kellogg Foundation committed approximately $24 million in 14 multi-sector collaborations in communities across the United States to implement a TRHT process using the framework. Each place received a grant through a coordinating organization for implementing their TRHT and to a growth fund to sustain the work for the long-term. The growth fund is also a place where additional funding is actively being raised and matched by other national, regional and local funders. The investments in each TRHT place range from approximately $1.5 to $4 million and implementation can be from two-to-five years.

As TRHT/Richmond's coordinating organization, Initiatives of Change is keen to partner with the other TRHT locales which include (1) State of Alaska; (2) Baton Rouge and (3) New Orleans, Louisiana; (4) Buffalo, New York; (5) Chicago, Illinois; (6) Dallas, Texas; (7) Los Angeles, California; (8) Selma, Alabama; (9) Saint Paul, Minnesota; and (10) Battle Creek, (11) Flint, (12) Kalamazoo and (13) Lansing, Michigan. There are also other TRHT-related efforts happening nationally. A primary example being the work of the Association of American Colleges & Universities and their work to establish TRHT Centers at 30 schools across the U.S.  

In October 2017, a team from TRHT/Selma visited Richmond to share about their work in Alabama and to learn about IofC's work of walking through history, building a team and partnering with local leadership.  

TRHT Selma with TRHT Richmond ©Karen Elliott Greisdorf -3660.jpg

Callie Greer

Community Organizer,
Selma Center for Nonviolence Truth & Reconciliation

"I am so full from my visit to Richmond and ALL you have accomplished. I was really inspired with all of the folk that showed up personally and shared with us. That speaks volumes to me in my spirit. I am working towards that kind of relationship with our folk here in Selma. Trust. Respect. Concern for each other. Yeah, that's huge for me."

TRHT Selma with TRHT Richmond ©Karen Elliott Greisdorf -3745.jpg

Rev. Robert Turner

Project Director, TRHT/Selma &
Program Officer, Black Belt Community Foundation

"We learned a lot of helpful tools, insights, and practices. Our vision for Selma is for it to be a blessing that could change the world again toward Truth, Justice and Transformation - for Selma to become like Richmond, a place, which while it is not perfect, has laid a roadmap for future generations to follow on how to transform a community."

Image 1: Callie Greer shares the challenges and opportunities for TRHT/Selma when meeting with the Initiatives of Change staff and team of local volunteers.  Images 2-3: Rev. Sylvester "Tee" Turner leads the visitors from Selma on a walk through Richmond's history beginning in Libby Hill Park under the watchful eye of the Confederate monument honoring sailors and soldiers. Rev. Turner stressed the importance of honoring all stories as sacred at that place: African American, Native American and Confederate. Images 4-5: The visit moved on to the banks of the James River and the head of the Trail of Enslaved Africans where the Selma team learned about the details of disembarkation and treatment of the enslaved men and women before they were either sold in Richmond or transported to another commercial port. Images 6-8: Selma team members, Rev. Robert Turner, Brendan O'Connor and Lawrence Wofford, learn from community leaders: Dr. Risha Berry, Office of Community Wealth Building; Carol Adams, former Director of Community Outreach, Richmond Police Department; Del. Betsy Carr (D); Michael Paul Williams, Columnist, Richmond Times-Dispatch. Image 9: Ainka Jackson, Director, Selma Center for Nonviolence, Truth  & Reconciliation.